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Medical Ethics

Patient Survives Death Sentence - Medical Negligence?

August 30, 2015 by Michael Kirsch

Doctors do not know everything.    We make mistakes and mistakes in judgment.  Sometimes we make the mistake of speaking when we should keep silent.  At times, patients ask us questions that we can’t or shouldn’t answer; and yet we do.  It shouldn’t be our objective to force certainly into an issue which is...[read more]

Who Deserves Quality Medical Care?

August 17, 2015 by Michael Kirsch
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Quality Care Waffle

We all should know the difference between a slogan and real substance.   One of these has size and shape while the other is just a shadow.   Why then, is the slogan so powerful?A slogan is one of the weapons wielded by the Guardians of Political Correctness.  They will point toward the slogan du jour, and then,...[read more]

Expanding Medicaid benefits for improved behavioral health care, substance abuse treatment

August 4, 2015 by Cynthia Telles

Cynthia Telles is the director of the Spanish-speaking Psychosocial Clinic of the Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital at UCLA, she is also an associate clinical professor at the university. She provides training and hosts comprehensive mental-health services to the community. Cynthia Telles has also been on the board of Kaiser Foundation Hospitals and Health Plans for over 10+ years.[read more]

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A Healthier Conversation

June 17, 2015 by Edgar Wilson

Lawsuits can stem from poor doctor-patient communication. So how will EHRs change the equation--for better or worse?[read more]

Why Retail Competition for Doctors Is Just Plain Scary

May 22, 2015 by Lonnie Hirsch

During the past five to 10 years, competition among healthcare providers has gone from fairly benign or annoyingly disruptive to a painful upheaval. From hospitals and health systems to solo practitioners, the competitive landscape has changed, and one of the most significant factors that many doctors find especially scary is the staggering ramp-up and value-added sophistication of retail clinics as the platform for health care delivery in the US.[read more]

Life Expectancies and Lethal Injections

May 6, 2015 by Christine Kapsa, NP, DNP

Two stories converged unexpectedly in yesterday’s news. The first was an article in the New York Times discussing income inequality and shortened life expectancies. The other story came from the US Supreme Court. The Court heard arguments in Glossip v. Gross, a case from Oklahoma about the drugs used for lethal injection executions.[read more]

Doctors and Their Patients: Commitments to Caring

January 12, 2015 by Christine Kapsa, NP, DNP

Contrasts can be startling. The contrasts in physicians’ commitment to patients in our money-soaked system can be particularly stark. Even to those of us inured to unfairness, some contrasts hit full force when you least expect them. So it was as I read an article in the New York Times shortly after reading two posts in The Health Care Blog (THCB).[read more]

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BioPharma Beat: Is Commercial Support of CME A Bad Idea?

November 24, 2014 by David Davidovic

Companies are interested in funding continuing medical education because they feel that doctors need to stay on top of new medical discoveries. Yes, one can connect the dots and conclude that the more educated a physician is on current medical advances, the higher the likelihood they will use them - but what’s wrong with that?[read more]

Patience Is a Virtue

September 22, 2014 by Christine Kapsa, NP, DNP

A bottomless chasm separates health care in developed and developing countries. This situation seems largely acceptable to the West. It’s rarely noted in policy debates. WHO and Doctors Without Borders have it covered. The philosophical arguments about fairness and the less fortunate are centuries-old. No new insights forthcoming.[read more]

Are Those Cute Baby Pictures in the Doctor's Office Offending HIPAA?

September 18, 2014 by Stewart Gandolf, MBA

Pictures and Privacy

Baby pictures have a nearly universal “human touch” appeal. On the social media scale of cuteness, engagement and share-ability, babies, kids and grandkids are at the top. But evidently “cute” has its limits when baby pictures are publically posted, as they commonly are, in doctors’ offices.[read more]

Why Outsourcing Your IRO Is a Good Idea

September 18, 2014 by Abby Norman

Outsourcing IROs

In any industry there are times when an outside perspective is the difference between progress and an impasse. In healthcare, where the bottom line of can be at odds with the wants and needs of the patients and payers, a third-party perspective can help to untangle the web of miscommunication.[read more]

Veterans and mHealth: A Sensible Patient Engagement Strategy

September 17, 2014 by Bill Crounse

Patient Engagement

The US Department of Veterans Affairs has been taking it on the chin of late with allegations (and proof) of delayed appointments and care at some facilities, and charges that these delays have led to poor outcomes and even death. This is most likely caused by poor administration rather than poor care.[read more]