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Three Research Techniques For Patient Experience Breakthroughs

July 24, 2015 by Christopher Fox

Using fieldwork techniques from anthropology sheds light on what’s working and what’s not in ways that are hard to replicate either by making assumptions or by traditional patient satisfaction surveys. Here are three such techniques you can use to develop a nuanced picture of the patient experience at the point of care and bring clues to the surface for how to make it better.[read more]

High-Deductible Insurance and Rising Bad Debt

July 24, 2015 by Phil C. Solomon

Hospitals and physician groups are carefully watching the growing popularity of high-deductible health plans (HDHP) which result in patients taking on more of a financial responsibility for their healthcare. With the out-of-pocket costs for patients increasing due to the popularity of HDHPs, and with so few purchasers taking advantage of savings plans, the risk of bad debt and charity care increases for healthcare providers.[read more]

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Addressing the Phenomenon of “Pill Mill” Doctors

July 23, 2015 by Bert Louthian

While the country seems to be in a constant debate about what effects legalizing or decriminalizing marijuana may have on our youth, it seems that not enough people are paying attention to the effects legal narcotics are having on our elderly -- or how often physicians are prescribing them.[read more]

Thrive 4-7: Teaching Wellness Skills

July 23, 2015 by Janet Kennedy

Do companies and corporations finally get the importance of wellness programs for their employees? Connie Mester is betting her startup on the idea that they are. She has taken 16 years of experience in healthcare and health insurance to found a company focused on helping individuals learn how to achieve emotional wellness.[read more]

Doctors 2.0 and You: Conference, Community, and Medical Association #doctors20

July 22, 2015 by Denise Silber

This was my second time attending the Doctors 2.0 and You conference in Paris. My first time was last year and I plan to attend every year from now on. Why? Short answer: The people I meet, the speakers and their presentations, information on the latest trends, and the early discussions about collaborative projects all start at the conference and then continue to mature after the conference.[read more]

Internet Marketing and Healthcare’s Digital Decision Makers

July 22, 2015 by Stewart Gandolf, MBA

The profound influence of the Internet in American society is drawing healthcare marketing away from traditional communications channels. Online search and social media are the starting points for most patient health journeys, and they are major influences in the selection of doctors and hospitals.[read more]

Top 5 Mistakes Healthcare Organizations Make with PPC

July 21, 2015 by Jonathan Catley

Paid search advertising (PPC) has become a critical component to marketing strategies for all types of healthcare providers, from small physician groups to multi-location health systems. PPC campaigns can be extremely effective in increasing the number of procedures performed, new patient intakes, and requests for additional...[read more]

3 Big Healthcare Trends To Watch in 2015

July 21, 2015 by Moira O'Connell

Healthcare trends from specialty pharmacy to accreditation have been gaining traction this year in the healthcare world. We have been keeping an eye on three additional healthcare trends that we expect to hugely impact the healthcare industry through the end of the year and continuing on to 2016. From ICD-10 to telehealth, let's explore these important trends and what they mean for healthcare![read more]

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Four Life-Changing Ways To Keep Medical Costs Down

July 21, 2015 by Nik Donovic

It's no secret that medical costs in the United States are quite high. Here are four ways to keep costs down as much as possible.[read more]

One Food that is Killing You

July 21, 2015 by Gary Epler
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Too much omega-6 is one food that scientists are now saying will cause increased mortality by causing inflammation throughout the body resulting in heart disease and stroke.[read more]

Should Physicians Profile Our Patients?

July 20, 2015 by Michael Kirsch

Does profiling make sense for physicians? If you are trying to reduce a certain disease that is largely restricted to one segment of the population, doesn’t it make sense to target this segment rather than everyone? Profiling in law enforcement is a very sensitive issues, particularly for minorities who have been victimized by this technique. But, if we abandon the procedure entirely, are we forfeiting a tool that could keep us all safer?[read more]

The New Rules for Successful Hospital Marketing

July 20, 2015 by Stewart Gandolf, MBA
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Marketing-savvy hospital administrators—and their tuned-in communications teams—are writing new rules for success in reaching, attracting and retaining patients. As the nation’s healthcare delivery system has become an ever-changing playing field, many of the “old rules” of marketing are less important—including more than a few that are now passé.[read more]

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NCQA Accreditation: Failure vs. Success

July 16, 2015 by Danyell Jones

Some of the biggest Health Plans are failing accreditation, find out four distinct differentiators between those who successfully become accredited, and those who fall short[read more]

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Do Wearable Health Devices Actually Lead to Better Health?

July 16, 2015 by Rick Deglado

via Flickr

Wearable health devices are looked at as the next big frontier in technology, where many of the new and most intriguing advances are expected to take place over the coming years. While some wearables might not be taking off like some thought they would, wearable health devices are a different matter.[read more]

Glass Half-Empty? Not for MS Blogger Matt Cavallo [Podcast]

July 15, 2015 by Janet Kennedy

Matt Cavallo took it hard when he was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis... then he got on with living his life to the fullest. He shares his story with Janet Kennedy on the Get Social Health podcast.[read more]

The Specialty Drug Pricing Conundrum: Caps May Raise Costs, Not Lower Them

July 15, 2015 by David E Williams

It used to require hundreds of thousands of patients taking a drug to make it blockbuster. But over the last decade drug companies have figured out that they can get to $1 billion in product sales with much smaller populations. The key: sky-high prices. So what can be done, if anything? Well, a few things.[read more]

Marketing Shared Appointments: Paradigm Shift in Healthcare [Podcast]

July 14, 2015 by Lonnie Hirsch

via Shutterstock

Healthcare delivery in the United States is experiencing a significant paradigm shift to find innovative ways to care for patients. Are shared appointments part of the new way of doing medicine? The benefits to patients and doctors are discussed in this podcast.[read more]

Reducing Readmissions and Costs for Total Joint Replacement

July 14, 2015 by Anne Weiler

via Shutterstock

Last week CMS announced a major new initiative for Total Joint Replacement, aimed at both reducing and reconciling costs. Total joint replacements are predicted to increase at a rate of 30% to 2020. Demographics are the major driver: people are getting joint replacements at a younger age, and may have more than one in their lifetime. Since the demand is increasing, and the costs fluctuate wildly, up to 100% by Medicare’s estimates, the opportunities to look for costs savings and to reward based on outcomes is key.[read more]

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5 Tips for Managing Technology in Healthcare

July 13, 2015 by Jessica Oaks
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Technology in healthcare, or the digitization of healthcare, is a reality and one that is arguably streamlining things like patient intake, record sharing, patient tracking and treatment.[read more]

Concierge Medicine – For the Masses or the Elite?

July 13, 2015 by Stephen Schimpff

Is concierge medicine (also known as direct primary care, retainer-based, membership) for everyone or is it just for the rich, the 1%? Most people assume it is for the elite and cannot be afforded by the common man, the masses. That is unfortunate because in many cases it can be quite affordable. Here are three examples.[read more]

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Social Media Is Bad for Relationships

July 10, 2015 by Paul Tunnah
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Social media is a way of extending a virtual handshake to the entire world and finding out who extends a hand back. It’s a way of sharing your ideas and passions on a very broad scale and finding out who agrees or disagrees with your views. It’s a way of getting to know people with very diverse views on different issues and engaging in dialogue with them around these areas. In other words, it’s at the very top of the ‘funnel’ of building relationships, especially when it comes to healthcare.[read more]

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Beyond the Buzz: 12 Ways To Search For Health-Related Content On Twitter

July 10, 2015 by Marie Ennis-O'Connor

Most people search on Twitter using the simple native search facility, but you can do so much more with Twitter's advanced search capabilities. In today’s article, I will show you twelve ways you can use this powerful search engine to search for health-related content on Twitter.[read more]

Using Social Media to Promote Your Healthcare Events

July 9, 2015 by Michael Sherman
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Every medical facility has events. Whether it’s a maternity preparation class, a wellness fair or a blood drive, hospitals and other healthcare facilities are always looking for ways to get the public involved. While each one of these events is great and can be very insightful, none of that matters if people fail to show up.[read more]

Partners HealthCare Goes Global: Is It a Good Idea?

July 9, 2015 by David E Williams

In shift, Partners HealthCare seeking growth globally in today’s Boston Globe describes how Partners is turning its focus from dominating the Massachusetts healthcare delivery system to looking for revenue growth overseas.[read more]

Sports Medicine Enhancing Care for Amateur and Professional Athletes

July 8, 2015 by Erica Carnevale

Anyone who has watched an NFL game has seen the elite athleticism—and its potential for injuries. Our job as Athletic Trainers is to help prevent, evaluate and treat conditions ranging from concussions to soft tissue sprains and strains, fractures/dislocations and internal injuries. We also care for our share of chronic conditions.[read more]

Saving Relationship Medicine with Direct Primary Care

July 8, 2015 by Stephen Schimpff

The fundamental problem in health care delivery today is a highly dysfunctional payment system that leads to higher costs, lesser quality and reduced satisfaction. It also means less time between doctor and patient with the loss of “relationship medicine.” The core problem? Price controls and regulations that reduce the trust and core interactions between doctor and patient.[read more]

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The Future of E-Cigarettes in the World of Public Health

July 7, 2015 by Gal Cohen

via Shutterstock

The popularity of e-cigarettes continues to grow with every passing year. Words like “vape” are now part of our everyday vernacular, and it’s becoming increasingly more common to see people vaping instead of smoking.[read more]

A Tale of Two Gowns: The Patient Experience

July 7, 2015 by Tracy Granzyk MS, CPHQ
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Do you know who your patients are? If you haven’t asked, it might be a good idea because they have skills and they are paying attention. Maybe just these few patient engagement/experience tips could be bullet-pointed and handed out at white coat ceremonies, or posted in hospital break rooms across the country.[read more]

Dr. Google, I'd Like You to Meet Google Insurance Co.

July 6, 2015 by Jeanne Pinder

Google Insurance Co.? It might be right around the corner. Google has been tinkering with insurance for a few years now, and its recent activities suggest more of the same. Google’s primary source of income, of course, is advertising, and a quick look at the company’s ad revenue gives a clear picture of business opportunities to come.[read more]

The 80-20 Rule and Disruptive Healthcare Professionals

July 6, 2015 by Tracy Granzyk MS, CPHQ

Those who aren’t convinced it is just good form or good karma to treat patients and/or colleagues with dignity and respect can turn to a growing body of formal research that contends bullying and incivility in the workplace has many costs, including patient safety and workforce overall well-being.[read more]