AACC Convention: Takeaways and Industry Updates

July 19, 2012
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Executive vice president David Dolinger,, Ph.D., of a company called Seegene, was good enough to spend some time with me, to explain the firm’s new technology. An official announcement of this diagnostic advance was made today at the AACC show. 

Executive vice president David Dolinger,, Ph.D., of a company called Seegene, was good enough to spend some time with me, to explain the firm’s new technology. An official announcement of this diagnostic advance was made today at the AACC show. 

 
Key about this technology, which Dolinger says will “take molecular diagnostics to the next level,” is that it requires no capital investment. “We are licensing our new technology, which allows symptom-based diagnosis, to other diagnostic firms,” he says. This new technology allows testing for up to 30 targets in one assay. “We’re actually taking medicine from a subjective practice to a science,” said Dolinger. “If you input the correct information, you get actionable information back. With the right markers, you can ask and get the answers to very specific questions. 
 
Rather than using one test per virus, this procedure allows testing for multiple viral enemies with one assay, keeping costs down. “This technology is here, now,” said Dolinger. “We’re not going to hide it when it could change the practice of medicine so substantially. Making it available by license opens this technological door to a broad market. It will potentially make a difference to patients around the world.” Seegene has offices in Maryland, Korea and Germany.
 
The general manager of Arkray, Susumu Akatsu, announced the introduction of a new bench-top analyzer, the Aution II, which can run 450 urinalyses per hour. A fully automated urine analysis system, the AU-4050, which combines urine chemistry and flow cytometry, will be forthcoming from the company next year. The one-station system has what Akatsu calls a “small footprint,” is part of the firm’s push to penetrate US markets. They claim they can standardize systems to fit any size lab.
 
Genisphere has adapted its 3DNA dendrimer signal amplification technology for lateral flow, point-of-care assays, according to Jim Kadushin, vice president and COO, providing improved sensitivity and enabling a broad array of tests at the patient interface. Lateral flow assays represent a unique and growing class of tests designed to quickly diagnose patients for whom time is a key factor.

Genisphere’s 3DNA® signal amplifiers will enable the commercialization of new LF assays that otherwise could not be launched due to unacceptably low sensitivity, and, according to the company, will help labs set themselves apart from a market flooded with products that are limited by both sensitivity and quantitative accuracy.

“Genisphere’s 3DNA® technology provides an improvement of sensitivity in lateral flow assays that no other system has been able to achieve,” said Kadushin.