Medical Ethics

Are We Doing Too Much to Save Preemies?

1 Mins read

In the 1960s, when the first NICUs opened, premature infants had a 95 percent chance of dying. Today, they have a 95 percent chance of survival…Now we face a difficult choice, one not unlike that facing physicians who take care of adults near the end of their life: whom to fight for and whom to let go.

In the 1960s, when the first NICUs opened, premature infants had a 95 percent chance of dying. Today, they have a 95 percent chance of survival…Now we face a difficult choice, one not unlike that facing physicians who take care of adults near the end of their life: whom to fight for and whom to let go.

Survivors of extreme prematurity have frequent, and often severe, complications during their time in the NICU. In the worst cases, these children will suffer lifelong disabilities: cerebral palsy; severe visual impairment that thick glasses and eye surgery can only partly correct; scarred lungs that will leave them reliant on oxygen tanks; intellectual and behavioral problems that put them well behind their peers.

More on quality of care to premature babies in the NYT.

  

Related posts
Hospital AdministrationMedical Ethics

A Short Guide To Medical Waste Management For Every Facility

6 Mins read
Managing waste in medical facilities is a frequently overlooked topic for healthcare practitioners. In a high-pressure environment that makes life or death…
Medical EthicsPublic Health

Lessons For Understanding The Cord Blood Transplant Process

3 Mins read
  The discovery of stem cells in the cord blood dates back to the year 1978. Following this development, it took ten…
eHealthHealth careMedical EducationMedical EthicsParenting

Vaping Health Risks Raise Alarm About Educating Younger Generations

3 Mins read
  For thousands of adults, vaping has provided a way to quit smoking. While the jury is out on whether vaping is…