Medical DevicesTechnology

Tissue Ablation is Predominantly Cancer Therapy

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Tissue ablation is defined as the “removal of a body part or the destruction of its function, as by surgery, disease, or a noxious substance.” Put more simply, ablation is considered to be a therapeutic destruction and sealing of tissue.

The technologies representing the majority of physical (rather than chemical) ablation are comprised of the following:

Tissue ablation is defined as the “removal of a body part or the destruction of its function, as by surgery, disease, or a noxious substance.” Put more simply, ablation is considered to be a therapeutic destruction and sealing of tissue.

The technologies representing the majority of physical (rather than chemical) ablation are comprised of the following:

  • Electrical
  • Radiation
  • Light
  • Radiofrequency
  • Ultrasound
  • Cryotherapy
  • Thermal (other than cryotherapy)
  • Microwave
  • Hydromechanical

Source: Report #A145, “Ablation Technologies Worldwide Market, 2009-2019: Products, Technologies, Markets, Companies and Opportunities.”

The largest share of the market for energy-based ablation devices is used in cancer therapy, primarily using the radiation therapy modality. Following that is general surgery with its use of electrocautery and electrosurgical devices, RF ablation, cryotherapy, etc. Cardiovascular is thought to be third, even though cardiovascular is making the most noise in the medical press with RF and cryoablation of atrial fibrillation, this segment is thought to be third in share order. The remaining applications are relatively small and fall in line behind the three leading sectors.

     

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I serve the interests of medical technology company decision-makers, venture-capitalists, and others with interests in medtech producing worldwide analyses of medical technology markets for my audience of mostly medical technology companies (but also rapidly growing audience of biotech, VC, and other healthcare decision-makers). I have a small staff and go to my industry insiders (or find new ones as needed) to produce detailed, reality-grounded analyses of current and potential markets and opportunities. I am principally interested in those core clinical applications served by medical devices, which are expanding to include biomaterials, drug-device hybrids and other non-device technologies either competing head-on with devices or being integrated with devices in product development. The effort and pain of making every analysis global in scope is rewarded by my audience's loyalty, since in the vast majority of cases they too have global scope in their businesses. Specialties: Business analysis through syndicated reports, and select custom engagements, on medical technology applications and markets in general/abdominal/thoracic surgery, interventional cardiology, cardiothoracic surgery, patient monitoring/management, wound management, cell therapy, tissue engineering, gene therapy, nanotechnology, and others.
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