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Technology advances in spine surgery

September 15, 2015 by Patrick Driscoll

Manufacturers, clinicians and others focusing on technology advancement in spine surgery are not developing radical innovations, but are making enough incremental improvements in a number of ways that result in growth in the industry.  Most improvements fall into a number of categories:New materials technologies: Historically,...[read more]


World’s First Approved Malaria Vaccine Shows a Ray of Hope but Also Leaves Much Scope for an Improved Solution

August 20, 2015 by Varsha Jain

Malaria control tools currently available to the world have allowed the elimination of this deadly condition in many regions across the globe. While it is entirely preventable and treatable, it is also a major killer in sub-Saharan Africa. According to the WHO, almost 90% of all malaria deaths across the globe (an estimated 627,000) in...[read more]

Not Using Digital Advertising for Your Clinical Trial Patient Recruitment?

August 12, 2015 by Dan Stempel

Just under 40 percent of all clinical trials fail to meet their enrollment targets, and more than 10 percent don’t even manage to enroll a single patient, according to a Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development (Tufts CSDD) Impact Report. In order to avoid an equally ill-fated outcome, e-recruiting is an increasingly important part of the clinical trial recruitment process.[read more]


Addressing the Phenomenon of “Pill Mill” Doctors

July 23, 2015 by Bert Louthian

While the country seems to be in a constant debate about what effects legalizing or decriminalizing marijuana may have on our youth, it seems that not enough people are paying attention to the effects legal narcotics are having on our elderly -- or how often physicians are prescribing them.[read more]

Doctors 2.0 and You: Conference, Community, and Medical Association #doctors20

July 22, 2015 by Denise Silber

This was my second time attending the Doctors 2.0 and You conference in Paris. My first time was last year and I plan to attend every year from now on. Why? Short answer: The people I meet, the speakers and their presentations, information on the latest trends, and the early discussions about collaborative projects all start at the conference and then continue to mature after the conference.[read more]

Should Physicians Profile Our Patients?

July 20, 2015 by Michael Kirsch

Does profiling make sense for physicians? If you are trying to reduce a certain disease that is largely restricted to one segment of the population, doesn’t it make sense to target this segment rather than everyone? Profiling in law enforcement is a very sensitive issues, particularly for minorities who have been victimized by this technique. But, if we abandon the procedure entirely, are we forfeiting a tool that could keep us all safer?[read more]

Reducing Readmissions and Costs for Total Joint Replacement

July 14, 2015 by Anne Weiler

via Shutterstock

Last week CMS announced a major new initiative for Total Joint Replacement, aimed at both reducing and reconciling costs. Total joint replacements are predicted to increase at a rate of 30% to 2020. Demographics are the major driver: people are getting joint replacements at a younger age, and may have more than one in their lifetime. Since the demand is increasing, and the costs fluctuate wildly, up to 100% by Medicare’s estimates, the opportunities to look for costs savings and to reward based on outcomes is key.[read more]

Sports Medicine Enhancing Care for Amateur and Professional Athletes

July 8, 2015 by Erica Carnevale

Anyone who has watched an NFL game has seen the elite athleticism—and its potential for injuries. Our job as Athletic Trainers is to help prevent, evaluate and treat conditions ranging from concussions to soft tissue sprains and strains, fractures/dislocations and internal injuries. We also care for our share of chronic conditions.[read more]

Diagnostic Reading #33: Five Must-Read Articles from the Past Week

June 30, 2015 by Erica Carnevale

It is time for another issue of Diagnostic Reading. This week we focus on the U.S. Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Care Act, quality in radiology, patient and radiologist interactions, new Joint Commission rules, and Medicare’s slow adoption of telemedicine.[read more]

Is Gastric Bypass the Right Choice?

June 28, 2015 by Michael Kirsch

Bariatric surgery, including gastric bypass surgery, has become a popular remedy for obesity in this country. Hospitals have weighed in on this issue and are marketing this service directly to the public who are ever willing customers of this slenderizing surgery. It profoundly reroutes the guts and changes every day of your life. After GIB, there is no normal life afterwards. Your life is irrevocably altered.[read more]

Diagnostic Reading #30: Five Must Read Articles From the Past Week

June 10, 2015 by Erica Carnevale

Diagnostic Reading highlights five must-read articles published in the last seven days. This week’s articles focus on Stage 3 Meaningful Use, dense breast tissue, VNAs, breast cancer screening, and mobile app adoption among radiologists.[read more]

Personal or Population Health? Big Data or Small Data?

June 10, 2015 by Anne Weiler

June’s Seattle Health Innovator’s Meetup topic was on Innovations in Population Health Management. Interestingly much of the discussion from panelists circled back to the individual patient. It seems that much of this was because the great promise of big data analytics in healthcare and automation and economies of scale through electronic medical records have not been realized. The audience consisted of entrepreneurs building solutions in this area, and innovative and entrepreneurial people within health systems.[read more]