Global HealthcareMedical Innovations

Future Diabetes Treatment Approaches

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Research in the diabetes field has taken two main directions: improving current therapies, and exploring radical new approaches. Improvements in current therapy include making glucose monitoring and insulin delivery less invasive and more patient-friendly, and many significant advances have been made in this context in the past two decades. Among these have been the development of insulin pumps and of non- or minimally-invasive techniques for sampling blood. New, fast-acting forms of insulin have been introduced.

Research in the diabetes field has taken two main directions: improving current therapies, and exploring radical new approaches. Improvements in current therapy include making glucose monitoring and insulin delivery less invasive and more patient-friendly, and many significant advances have been made in this context in the past two decades. Among these have been the development of insulin pumps and of non- or minimally-invasive techniques for sampling blood. New, fast-acting forms of insulin have been introduced. There has been considerable research in non-injection dosage forms for insulin, and the first inhaled insulin product has recently been approved. This could herald a new era in insulin therapy.

Another ground-breaking development will be the successful development and regulatory approval of an “artificial pancreas.” This is the term used to describe a system in which continuous glucose monitoring is linked electronically to continuously variable insulin delivery, effectively making diabetes control automatic and freeing the patient to get on with his/her life. The technology behind an artificial pancreas is still being developed but it is at an advanced stage.  While the major components — an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor — are already on the market, and as a combined system by one manufacturer (Medtronic), the FDA has not approved a unified system in which the system runs autonomously by glucose readings driving insulin infusion rates.  The algorithms, software and other systems necessary are likely to gain approval in only 1-2 years.

More radical approaches to diabetes mellitus, also the subject of vigorous research, include ways of replacing the whole cumbersome business of glucose testing and insulin administration. Transplantation of healthy pancreatic islets into diabetic patients has been explored, but the problems of rejection are a significant hurdle. More promising is the modification of adult or embryonic stem cells so that they develop into pancreatic beta-cells capable of being implanted in the patient and serving as a replacement for the insulin-secreting cells that have been destroyed.

Further in the future are developments based on genetic manipulation. Several gene anomalies have been identified as related to the development of type 1 diabetes in particular, and these may present targets for intervention to prevent the disease from developing.

The global market for products in the management of diabetes (monitoring, anti-diabetic drugs and insulin) is a $5 billion market currently and is growing at over 9% annually, a rate that is unlikely to slow while rates of obesity prevalence keep climbing.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; “Diabetes Management: Products, Technologies, Markets and Opportunities Worldwide 2009-2018.” Report #D510.

     

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I serve the interests of medical technology company decision-makers, venture-capitalists, and others with interests in medtech producing worldwide analyses of medical technology markets for my audience of mostly medical technology companies (but also rapidly growing audience of biotech, VC, and other healthcare decision-makers). I have a small staff and go to my industry insiders (or find new ones as needed) to produce detailed, reality-grounded analyses of current and potential markets and opportunities. I am principally interested in those core clinical applications served by medical devices, which are expanding to include biomaterials, drug-device hybrids and other non-device technologies either competing head-on with devices or being integrated with devices in product development. The effort and pain of making every analysis global in scope is rewarded by my audience's loyalty, since in the vast majority of cases they too have global scope in their businesses. Specialties: Business analysis through syndicated reports, and select custom engagements, on medical technology applications and markets in general/abdominal/thoracic surgery, interventional cardiology, cardiothoracic surgery, patient monitoring/management, wound management, cell therapy, tissue engineering, gene therapy, nanotechnology, and others.
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