Questions for Physicians to Ask & Avoid During Interviews

December 18, 2015
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Questions for Physicians to Ask & Not Ask During Interviews “Do you have any questions?” Many interviewees spend a lot of time practicing how to answer the recruiter’s questions; they then forget to prepare some of their own! You might wonder, “Is it important to ask questions?”

Questions for Physicians to Ask & Not Ask During Interviews “Do you have any questions?” Many interviewees spend a lot of time practicing how to answer the recruiter’s questions; they then forget to prepare some of their own! You might wonder, “Is it important to ask questions?”

Candidates who ask good questions stand out from the others. They come across as genuinely interested in the position. You probably wonder what constitutes good questions. Here are some ideas on what to ask (and avoid) in your next interview.

Questions to Ask

  1. What is the onboarding process for a new physician? You want to know that the employer has realistic expectations of you. Prepare follow-up questions that ask about the training resources available to the new hire (hopefully you). Consider asking to speak with the person who most recently went through the hiring process.
  2. What is your leadership style? When you interview with the person who directly supervises your work, ask this question of him or her. You need to know if that person’s management style fits your work style.
  3. How do you resolve conflicts between administrators and physicians? Physicians and administrators have different roles and distinct perspectives. Ask for a recent example of a conflict and make sure you get a complete answer as to how the group resolved it.
  4. How do you define someone who is successful in this position? This question, from my experience, is relevant to either a corporate or healthcare position. If an interviewer cannot clearly articulate how he or she defines successful performance, that is a huge red flag.
  5. How would you define your group’s culture? When you devote more than 40 hours per week to your career, a comfortable work environment is necessary. This question provides you with insight into factors that are not listed on a job description.
  6. Is there anything about my background that you want me to elaborate on? You want to remove any doubt from the interviewer’s mind that you are the most qualified candidate for the position. Make sure you draw out and resolve any questions about your capabilities.
  7. What is the timeframe for your decision? No matter how well you think an interview went, it is easy for the hiring process to get off track. Make sure you know that the practice has a firm timeline in place to make a decision.

Questions Not to Ask

Bad questions make you appear inattentive or unprepared. They quickly sink your chances for a great opportunity. In life, sometimes it is important to know what not to do in a specific situation. Avoid these questions during your next interview.

  1. Basic information that is available on the website. Do not ask, “When was the practice founded?” if it is in the first paragraph of the website. Interviewers expect you to pull up the website and review the organization’s history before the interview.
  2. What are the benefits? What is the compensation?  Feel free to ask follow up questions if an interviewer brings up the topics of pay and benefits. However, focus any questions you initiate on practice culture and performance expectations.
  3. Topics covered in the interview. Hiring managers complain online about interviewees who ask questions that were covered earlier in the conversation. If you believe someone was vague or ambiguous, ask a follow up question. Emphasize that you want clarification on an earlier point of discussion.

Finally- Ask for the Position!

One of the first things I learned as a recruiter was that organization’s like when people ask for the job. I recommend using phrases such as:

“I believe my experience makes me a great fit for your opening. I would accept an offer.”

“Based on everything you shared with me, I want you to join your group.”

Do not be afraid to get specifics from an interviewer. This process, ideally, lets both sides know if there is a good match.  Best of luck in your job search.

 

Sources

http://career-advice.monster.com/job-interview/interview-questions/5-questions-never-to-ask-in-job-interview/article.aspx

http://money.usnews.com/money/careers/slideshows/the-8-best-questions-to-ask-a-job-interviewer/5

http://www.thehappymd.com/blog/bid/332014/Physician-Job-Search-Interview-Questions-You-MUST-Ask