BusinessMedical DevicesMedical InnovationsTechnology

Surgical Sealants and Glues in the Balance of Wound Closure

2 Mins read

Sealants and glues are emerging as important adjunctive tools for sealing staple and suture lines, and some of these products also are being employed as general hemostatic agents to control bleeding in the surgical field.

Sealants and glues are emerging as important adjunctive tools for sealing staple and suture lines, and some of these products also are being employed as general hemostatic agents to control bleeding in the surgical field. Manufacturers have also developed surgical sealants and glues that are designed for specific procedures – particularly those in which staples and sutures are difficult to employ or where additional reinforcement of the internal suture/staple line provides an important safety advantage.Suture-line-pixelated

Surgical sealants are made of synthetic or naturally occurring materials and are commonly used with staples or sutures to help completely seal internal and external incisions after surgery. In this capacity, they are particularly important for lung, spinal, and gastrointestinal operations, in which leaks of air, cerebrospinal fluid, or blood through the anastomosis can cause numerous complications. Limiting these leaks results in reduced mortality rates, less post-operative pain, shorter hospital stays for patients, and decreased health care costs.

Although some form of suturing wounds has been used for thousands of years, sutures and staples can be troublesome. There are procedures in which sutures are too large or clumsy to place effectively, and locations in which it is difficult for the surgeon to suture. Moreover, sutures can lead to complications, such as intimal hyperplasia, in which cells respond to the trauma of the needle and thread by proliferating on the inside wall of the blood vessel, causing it to narrow at that point. This increases the risk of a blood clot forming and obstructing blood flow. In addition, sutures and staples may trigger an immune response, leading to inflamed tissue, which also increases the risk of a blockage. Finally, as mentioned above, sutured and stapled internal incisions may leak, leading to dangerous post-surgical complications.

These are some of the reasons why surgical adhesives are becoming increasingly popular, both for use in conjunction with suture and staples and on a stand-alone basis. As a logical derivative, surgeons want a sealant product that is strong, easy-to-use and affordable, while being biocompatible and resorbable. In reality, it is difficult for manufacturers to meet all of these requirements, particularly with biologically active sealants, which tend to be pricey. Thus, for physicians, there is usually a trade-off to consider when deciding whether or not to employ these products.

Screen Shot 2014-12-29 at 9.28.14 AMClosure of general surgical wounds (internal or external) is largely accomplished by a combination of surgical tapes, sutures & staples and, increasingly, surgical sealants and glues. For the reasons discussed, the rates of technology development and adoption among these causing a relative but not absolute decline of sutures and staples revenues worldwide.

Surgical sealants, glues, and hemostats can be divided into several different categories based on their primary components and/or their intended use. From a practical standpoint, they may be subdivided by composition into products containing biologically active agents, products made from natural and synthetic (nonactive) components, and nonactive scaffolds, patches, sponges, putties, powders, and matrices used as surgical hemostats.


Data drawn from MedMarket Diligence, LLC, Report #S192, “Worldwide Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Wound Closure Markets, 2013-2018.” See link.

Avatar
183 posts

About author
I serve the interests of medical technology company decision-makers, venture-capitalists, and others with interests in medtech producing worldwide analyses of medical technology markets for my audience of mostly medical technology companies (but also rapidly growing audience of biotech, VC, and other healthcare decision-makers). I have a small staff and go to my industry insiders (or find new ones as needed) to produce detailed, reality-grounded analyses of current and potential markets and opportunities. I am principally interested in those core clinical applications served by medical devices, which are expanding to include biomaterials, drug-device hybrids and other non-device technologies either competing head-on with devices or being integrated with devices in product development. The effort and pain of making every analysis global in scope is rewarded by my audience's loyalty, since in the vast majority of cases they too have global scope in their businesses. Specialties: Business analysis through syndicated reports, and select custom engagements, on medical technology applications and markets in general/abdominal/thoracic surgery, interventional cardiology, cardiothoracic surgery, patient monitoring/management, wound management, cell therapy, tissue engineering, gene therapy, nanotechnology, and others.
Articles
Related posts
BusinessMarketing

5 Creative Ways to Advertise in the Healthcare Industry

4 Mins read
The healthcare industry is a dynamic one, with medical innovations, patient needs, financial obligations and changing regulations driving caregivers and administrators to…
BusinessFinance

How Invoice Factoring Can Help Medical Transcription Companies

6 Mins read
Medical transcription companies provide great services for hospitals, physicians, and clinics. Working in the healthcare industry can be very rewarding, but there…
Medical InnovationsSpecialtiesTechnology

Deciphering the Controversy of Adipose Derived Stem Cells in the Context of Healthcare

4 Mins read
As we enter a new era of medical advancements, several new techniques in medicine have been pioneered. You may have heard of…