Getting the Most Out of Your Golf Game

August 31, 2013
165 Views

Ah golf. I love this game. It can be such a frustrating sport, but nothing can beat the feeling of a well struck ball or the sound of the ball hitting the green. I don’t get out nearly as often I would like, but when I do I fully enjoy what the sport provides: a solid four hours of time with good friends out in the beautiful outdoors. When I can find the time to squeeze in a round I want nothing to get in the way.

Ah golf. I love this game. It can be such a frustrating sport, but nothing can beat the feeling of a well struck ball or the sound of the ball hitting the green. I don’t get out nearly as often I would like, but when I do I fully enjoy what the sport provides: a solid four hours of time with good friends out in the beautiful outdoors. When I can find the time to squeeze in a round I want nothing to get in the way. So when I heard that Sitka Wellness was putting on a Golf Workshop to learn how to get the most out of your game and prevent injuries, I grabbed a friend and we went to go and check it out.

Sitka Wellness is a full-service physiotherapy and wellness clinic located in the heart of downtown Vancouver. Along with physiotherapy services, Sitka offers group Yoga and Pilates classes as well as Personal Training. The instructors work closely with the therapists to tailor programs to each individual’s needs. What we love most about Sitka, besides their integrated approach to health, is that they put on monthly community workshops that anyone can attend. They range from managing chronic pain to training for your first 10k. Anne attended a workshop on minimalist running last month.

health and fitness with golfJason Lee, Registered Physiotherapist and TPI Certified Golf Fitness Professional started off the workshop by discussing some of the basic functional movements required to perform a golf swing such as squats, pelvic tilts and trunk rotations. Jason used the example of balancing on one leg. If you weren’t able to perform this simple movement, then you wouldn’t be able to follow through correctly by finishing with all your weight on your front leg. Flexibility, strength, coordination, balance and endurance are all important factors in maximizing your performance. A physical therapist can help you break down your movements and determine where you might need to focus your energy and improve.

preventing golf injuries

The Reverse Spine Angle. The number one cause of lower back pain in golf.

Jason then walked us through these simple recommendations for avoiding injury.

1. Improving physical conditioning before the season starts

2. Warm up before you play, minimum 15 minutes

3. Using a push cart instead of carrying your clubs

4. Engage your core before your swing

5. Rotate through the hips instead of lateral sliding during your backswing

6. Avoid excessive extension as you finish your swing

 

images

Using the foam roller in this position can help open up tight chest muscles caused by sitting at a desk all day.

Tip #4  really stood out for me. I know engaging my core is one of my weaknesses and this is where Irene Lugsdin (a Pilates instructor at Sitka) came to the rescue. Pilates is an approach to exercise that focuses on the deep stabilizing muscles of the body or the core. Irene took us through some simple exercises that would help strengthen and lengthen the spine and that would facilitate the flexibility and mobility needed to enhance our golf swings. Irene described Pilates as breath with movement and so we focused on how your breath could help you engage your core but also infuse your swing with a fluid tempo. She also explained that golf is an asymmetrical sport while Pilates is all about symmetry and balance hence the reason these two activities are an excellent combination.

I really enjoyed the workshop. Jason and Irene were both very knowledgeable and engaging speakers. It was great to be able to breakdown the golf swing and really think about the mechanics and the movements/muscles required.  My friend Carla, who came along and who is an avid golfer, was surprised to see the Physiotherapist and Pilates instructor working together. She had never imagined such collaboration between the two practices, but after attending the workshop she thought that it made absolute sense.

Sitka offers comprehensive golf swing assessments where a physiotherapist will look for any dysfunctional movement patterns that could be limiting your performance. The 1 hour golf screen includes a walk through your injury history, a series of functional movement tests as well as a swing characteristic analysis using 2D video.  Once the assessment is complete, the PT can then work with you on an exercise program focused on improving any physical deficiencies that need to addressed. They will even work with and communicate with any golf instructors or personal trainers you might be working with outside the clinic.

We have noticed that many physical therapy clinics offer screening services for golf  and other sports such as Running, Tennis, Softball/Baseball and Cycling.  Working with a Physical Therapist is an excellent way to learn how to take care of and get the most out of your body no matter what you want to do.  I know that I am excited to take my new tips and tricks to golf course. I might even have a chance at beating Carla!